The more I read…

The more I read, the more I escape this body of presence, and enter eternity. I don’t age, I become immortal. I feel I’ve lived forever, though recently suffered an amnesia. This body holds nothing but desire. My mind is my abode, where reason, morality, past and future, even present, means something which is never-dying.

On Morality

Is commitment – whether religious, social, or idiosyncratic – capable of fighting curiosity? We are taught that chaos is a taboo, which, as a consequence, paradoxically becomes so magnetic to us; we fear the anarchy, which, supposedly, brings the downfall of man; of life’s inconstancies, which nonetheless keep our lives in flux, becoming the only … More On Morality

Hunger

   Canongate 2016; £9.99 Knut Hamsun (1859 – 1952) is certainly not among the most popular names in the literary field. Born in poverty in the Norwegian municipality of Lom, his early years were predominantly filled up with joyless and often painful memories. In time, and by force of circumstance, he eventually finds refuge in … More Hunger

Taduno’s Song

  (Canongate, 2016); pbk. £10.99   Dear readers, a new and powerfully intriguing novel just hit the literary market. The 4th of August is the date announced by Canongate Books for the publishing of the Nigerian novel Taduno’s Song (2016). “A novel about love,” it says on the back cover, “about sacrifice, about courage.” I … More Taduno’s Song

Schopenhauer on aesthetic experience as a relief of pain and suffering

A brief historical and philosophical account preceding Schopenhauer seems to me highly appropriate to begin with, much of it for the sake of the clear understanding of this paper and, more importantly, of Schopenhauer’s theories regarding aesthetic experience particularly, how the latter succeed in permeating the field of aesthetics and influence our own aesthetic visions. … More Schopenhauer on aesthetic experience as a relief of pain and suffering

Why should we take the case for the death of author/artist seriously?

I.               Traditionalistic VS. Post-Structuralist approach to literary criticism [T]o change the world, it is necessary to convince people that its ways are not self-evident: to show that what is presented to them as ‘natural’ is in fact what conforms to a particular ideological world-view, serving particular social interests. Ever since Barthes’s article “The Death of … More Why should we take the case for the death of author/artist seriously?